Icy, tangy loveliness from all the world’s tropical and sub-tropical countries pretty much.

Make up a strong brew of hibiscus tea with some honey, agave or maple syrup – you’ll need more than you think as the chilling diminishes the sweet.

Let it cool down a bit before popping in the fridge to chill down completely. Serve over ice when you’re ready to drink it.

David's Place 10

Hibiscus knowledge.

The tea made from hibiscus takes on many names in hot and cold form – Agua de Jamaica in Mexico and Honduras; Sorrel (confusingly) in Jamaica, Trinidad and throughout the Caribbean; Orhul in India, Gul e Khatmi in Urdu and Persian; Soobolo in Ghanian, Bissap in West Africa; and Karkadé in Sudan, Egypt and throughout Arab countries. It’s enjoyed cold with lime juice and syrup in Cambodia.

Botanists believe there are eight original species of hibiscus, ancestor’s of today’s 10,000 species, which originated in India, China, Mauritius, Hawaii, Fiji and/or Madagascar.

So there you have it, enjoy!

Sources: wiki and herbs2000

ps: the flowers are just from the garden for photo purposes – not necessary for drinking purposes – and not necessarily hibiscus for all we know!

pps: with thanks to David Turner Workshop for the props and access to daylight!

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